Substitutes for Alcohol in Cooking

Although it may be debatable to some whether or not alcohol really does burn-off in cooking, the issue remains to be something many people simply leave to the scientific facts and then decide what they’ll do about it once they know more. Check out this alcohol burn-off chart for more info on that.  The MHK chart below shows some of my favorite substitutes for alcohol that can be used in cooking.
I simply pair the flavor that the alcohol is derived from and find a similar non-alcoholic beverage or liquid to use. A PDF version of the chart is at the end of this post.
Halal Substitutes in Cooking- JPEG

PDF Version Available Here

 

14 comments

  1. assalamu alaikum,
    Please are things like white wine vinegar halal? if not what are the substitutes.

    Jzk

    • Yes, all vinegar are halal…there is a process called oxidation which removes the intoxicating/alcohol effect. Hence, all vinegars are halal. :)

  2. Salaaam,

    So are you saying ALL Vinegers are Halal ? What about Soya Sauce, i have heard that Naturally brewed ones are not OK ?

    Thanks

    • No, I didn’t say that all vinegars are halal. What I said in the post is that you have to check with each producer to see if wine or any other alcohol is added TO the final product.

      Soy sauce is a whole other thing- it’s not vinegar but it’s a fermented product which produces alcohol as a byproduct of its fermentation. Naturally brewed typically indicates that it has alcohol in the final product; whereas synthetic varieties of soy sauce typically do not (there are halal-certified ones), however, you need to check with each producer to see what is in it.

      • Jazakallah Khair, it was very beneficial to know that even Soya Sauce could contain alcohol based on the production mechanisms. I think a lot of Muslims including myself are negligent of this fact and often buy a bottle of it without knowing. Even I plan to sell soya sauce in my store very soon, but I shall remove the product immediately

  3. Hi, I love your website..Could you please clarify if balsamic vinegar is permissible to use..Thanks!

    • Most balsamic vinegar has red wine vinegar in it. I am always looking for an alternative, so would also love some suggestions from sister Yvonne.

    • Balsamic vinegar is Halal since the process is the same as normal vinegar..in short is “must” boiled and left to “develop” in barrels…the traditional process is really long and because of that is terribly expensive…most probable you will find on the market some sort of substitute that is must+caramel+vinegar…that anyway due to the oxidation process is halal too

  4. Are you aware of any substitutes for Marsala wine? I used to love Chicken Marsala, but I know better now, and of course wouldn’t even think about eating it. Would love to know if you’ve experimented with this at all. I’ve researched and attempted to create on my own with poor results.

    • Unfortunately marsala’s taste comes form the alcohol part and the resting period in barrels, so it’s quite impossible to simulate the taste…more in general cooking with alcohol even if not halal produces an halal food because all alcohol is burned and evaporated…same as vinegar, all vinegar at first stages are wines or other liquids with ethanol (not halal), after oxidation all ethanol (alcohol) become acetic acid..so it’s halal

  5. Thank you so much for this. I have always wondered what to use when a recipe calls for brandy or any other alcohol when cooking. SO really really appreciate for this.

  6. i cant find you in pinterest…link?

  7. Assalaamu’Alaikum
    I’m sorry to come in with a reply browsing through I came across and I couldn’t stay away from replying. It is a for only a specific question raised by ‘Nammi’ and replied to by Marix’ this is to both of your attention that when we speak of halal it’s important that consuming alcohol is not just the criteria there are other criteria which come into play which is also of the same depth and sin. If Nammi needs to use Marsala wine to make the chicken and understood that the reason given by Marix is logical, we missing the point that to use Marsala wine you need to buy it and that buying is also equally Haram as for the consumption and the process of vinegar and the explanation, it is important to understand that we are allowed to consume vinegar so we can consume it. As for the halal and haram when we know a particular thing to be haram we should not miss it and should keep away from it for the sake if Allah and InShaAllah we’ll be rewarded.

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