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Moroccan Crêpes

As you might be able to see from this blog, I’m a bit entranced by Moroccan things- style, geography, and the delicious, healthy and traditional food. Amanda Mouttaki is the author of Maroc Mama, a blog about her experience with and love of Moroccan culture and cuisine {and a whole lot more}. In this post she gladly shares her recipe for Moroccan crêpes, something we can all enjoy for breakfast, suhoor, dessert or just a snack. Very versatile. Enjoy!

Folded Crepes

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An Interview About Moroccan Interior Design with Maryam Montague

You might remember that not too long ago I published a review of the gorgeous design book, Marrakesh by Design, by American expat Maryam Montague who resides in Morocco and runs a boutique hotel called Peacock Pavillions. I was so enamored with the book and envisioned you, my readers, being able to enjoy it, too so that you could also have the inspiration at your fingertips to create Moroccan interior spaces that are so inviting in this book. 

Marrakesh by Design book cover

I also wanted to know more about Maryam (even though I’m an avid reader of her blog and follow her gorgeous pins about Moroccan design and textiles that inspire me all the time) and introduce her to you.  Here’s my interview with her and at the end of it, a chance to win a copy of the book for yourself, or as a perfect ‘Eid gift for someone you love to inspire, too. 

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Marrakesh By Design: A Book Review

All things Moroccan are re-captivating me like never before. I went through a time when I was younger where I was absolutely taken by the food, the traditions, the exotic nature of it all. I even visited Tangiers for a few short days while I was living in Spain, and that just intensified my love of the vibrant colors, vintage cookware, clay pottery, amazing food and textiles (particularly all those amazing doors). That excitement soon waned as real life stepped in and I knew that my chances of returning to explore Morocco were quite limited.  And then I found out about the life of Maryam Montague…

marrakesh by design full book cover

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Couscous with Dates and Butter

I recently posted a recipe for Moroccan Goat Stew which is fabulously delicious and can certainly be served over rice or even with just bread. When I was making it, however, I found myself craving a sweetened couscous. I thought about adding dried apricots to the couscous but I just didn’t have them on hand. I did have a handful of dates, though.

final dates with butter
Couscous with Deglet Noor Dates & Pastured Butter

Moroccan Goat Stew

Have you ever tried goat meat?  If you’ve seen them in real life, they’re not as meaty as those furry and cuddly lambs we all love to pet, though they’re cute and gentle creatures created for traversing rocky terrain around the world. When it comes to cooking goat meat, it can be a lot bonier than lamb, so some people have a difficult time justifiying the need to cook it when lamb is plentiful. I say, as long as it’s halal, I’ll try anything new– although we don’t have it often, goat meat is not new to me but this recipe is…

goat stew over couscous with dates

Moroccan Goat Stew over Couscous with Dates

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Pearl Couscous with Ground Veal, Almonds and Raisins

Pearl couscous is a wonderful salad couscous and quite different from what is normally found in restaurant dishes or alongside North African tagine dishes with meat. When cooked, t is more plump and chewy  than it’s smaller semolina-derived counterpart. The word couscous is actually a Berber one that means well-rounded or rolled which is exactly what I think of what I take a look at it.  It’s also quite popular in Sicilian cuisine, which must be why I love it so much…

Pearl Couscous with Ground Veal, Almonds and Raisins

This dish is light and perfect for a weeknight meal because it’s easy and quick to prepare and uses only two dishes- great for kitchen clean-up, although there is a bit of chopping to do so bring on the family and cook it together. To me, it’s almost like a salad in itself.

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moroccon

5 Tips to Create Your Very Own Moroccan Escape at Home

Lately I’ve been quite reminisce about my trip to Tangiers, Morocco in the mid-90’s. It was my first time in Africa and I’d never been to a place as exotic and strikingly different from the U.S. or Europe. The flavors, colors and scents were ones I felt instantly comfortable with and the intricate designs and deep-colored decor using uniquely Moroccan textiles have been a love of mine ever since.  So, I enlisted my friends over at Sakina Design, the dynamic and creative duo of Jontie and Pik, who agreed to share their expertise with all of us about how we can create our own Moroccan getaway no matter where we live…

Morocco has a certain allure to it. From its beautiful beaches and breath-taking deserts, to it’s friendly people and delicious cuisine. As a result, it’s a favorite vacation destination, an exotic retreat from our modern hectic lives.

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Moroccan food, cuisine, amlou, North African, Paula Wolfert

The Food of Morocco by Paula Wolfert: Cookbook Review and Recipe

I’ve been following Paula Wolfert, food writer and expert of Moroccan cuisine for many years. She has written numerous books on clay pot cooking and Moroccan cuisine, both of which have intrigued me immensly since my first trip there in 1995. Her latest book, The Food of Morocco, is a real treasure of collected recipes, photos capturing the Moroccan landscape, and antectodes of the people she has met over the years of her travels back and forth to the country to study the cuisine and cooking methods.

Cover of The Food of Morocco by Paula Wolfert- her latest book, a masterpiece of Moroccan cuisine

Paula was generous enough to share her recipe for

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Mina Harissa Giveaway | My Halal Kitchen

CLOSED: Spice Up Your Life with this Harissa Giveaway!

Have you ever had harissa, that hot and spicy condiment made red by combining chili peppers, garlic and perhaps some dry-roasted spices, then thrown into North African soups and stews for added flavor?

I liken harissa to the French pistou of North African cusine because, much like pistou, it is typically added to finished dishes for the fresh and pungent flavor it provides, to top off soups and stews, yet I would be perfectly happy dipping fresh rustic bread into a spoon of harissa (or pistou).

I recently taught a cooking class where we made a classic Moroccan dish: Chicken Tagine with Olives and Preserved Lemons, served with Couscous. We also made a homemade harissa to add to the tagine once it was on our plates, but with a new product on the market that offers harissa in a jar, made with healthy, high-quality ingredients, you could cut your cooking time down a bit while still incorporating a wonderful condiment into your dish.

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Lamb Stew with Pumpkin, Plantain, Sweet Potato and Chickpeas

When we look through recipes online or in magazines, what really prompts us to go out of our way to make a list and head out to the store with the intention of buying all the ingredients specifically for that recipe we enjoyed looking at so much?                                                                                     

I look at food for a living, literally, and am incredibly delighted by the vibrant colors and gorgeous photography that exists in the blogosphere and in the publishing world.  I can’t, however, make everything that awakens my stomach or inspires me to fly off the couch and dig into my cabinets for every spice listed in a recipe so that I, too, can make a gorgeous Thai noodle dish.

There is one Libyan dish, however, that prompted me to set out to use up our Qurbani meat to make this dish called Tbeikhet ‘Eid  which features pumpkin, chickpeas and raisins. I liked the idea of using seasonal produce like pumpkin so much that I decided to give it a try, though digressing a bit by using other ingredients that I had at home that were in much need of being used:

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